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Golf courses offer more than just a challenging round

SCENIC:  A female peacock spotted at the picturesque Mehta Golf Course in Lugazi.

SCENIC: A female peacock spotted at the picturesque Mehta Golf Course in Lugazi.

Golf Courses worldwide are treasured habitats of nature. From the beautiful species of a variety of flora and fauna, plants and flowers.

Throughout the entire East Africa and Great Lakes region, each of the various golf courses dotted across the divide has a unique attachment to nature conservation.
Regardless of locality and despite the encroachment threat from land developers, golf courses have for the record maintained the number one status of conserving nature.

From the beautiful well mowed lawns at Karen in Mombasa via Nairobi Club in the heart of the City to the far West in Kisumu, Kenyan golf courses like those in Uganda have a variety of grass species, trees and are known water catchment zones. Back home, Uganda Golf Club is a source to several wells with a rich variety of plant species.

Entebbe Golf Course’s proximity to the Uganda Wildlife Education Center (Entebbe Zoo) and the gigantic Lake Victoria is another added advantaged to the refugee animals and birds that need the fresh confines offered by the well-maintained green environs.

“Playing with the sweet melodies from the birds’ ‘choirs’ makes a round of golf exciting,” Sheila Kensime, a lady golfer, attests. Mehta Club at Lugazi is famed for the beautiful, multi-colored creatures – the peacocks.

WILDLIFE:  Lady golfer Dr Katy Kabenge (in the background) had to wait for a monkey to leave the green before holing out at hole No.8 in Entebbe Golf Club during one of her rounds.

WILDLIFE: Lady golfer Dr Katy Kabenge (in the background) had to wait for a monkey to leave the green before holing out at hole No.8 in Entebbe Golf Club during one of her rounds.

The beautiful volcanic plug in Tororo makes the Tororo Club a unique one because of the giant amazing rock. “A round of golf besides the source of Africa’s longest river – the Nile – is every golfer’s dream,” Jinja Club captain, Joseph Nkurunziza, says. Littering along golf courses is unacceptable. Tooro Club in Fort Portal has, for instance, kick-started a drive to put in place 200 littering bins across the course.

“The waste bins around the golf course have helped minimize the rate of littering while on the course,” Tooro Club chairman, Robert Asiime, says.

cap:L SCENIC: A female peacock spotted at the picturesque Mehta Golf Course in Lugazi.

cap: WILDLIFE: Lady golfer Dr Katy Kabenge (in the background) had to wait for a monkey to leave the green before holing out at hole No.8 in Entebbe Golf Club during one of her rounds.

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